feliciashanay:

#bickinbackbeinblack #happyeaster #monicamonica #turndownforwhet

ruddyroye:

April 20, 2014
“Go Witness”

They were saying to each other that today “He has risen from the dead.” It was a very quiet conversation between two church sisters but you could feel the excitement in the Spring air.
I stood downwind photographing their joy. I watched as the cold gentle breeze picked up their words like the falling blossoms or the minute pollens, to spread the message of this morning’s sermon to their communities. I pulled back, conscious that I was snapping the image of two elderly sage, repeating and re-plaiting the strands of belief, to be taught, rebranded, and reaffirmed in our lineage. #oggl_ig #blackportraiture #eastersunday #streetportrait #streetphotography #bedstuyportrait #brooklynportrait #brooklynphotography #makeportrait #makeportraits #igers #instamood #sonya7r (at Mt. Lebanon Baptist Church)

vintageblackglamour:

I would like to extend Easter greetings to everyone celebrating today with this beautiful photograph of two women in Harlem on Easter Sunday 1947 by the legendary French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908-2004). My favorite fun fact about Mr. Cartier-Bresson is that he and Langston Hughes were roommates as young struggling artists in Mexico in the 1930s. Photo: Henri Cartier-Bresson/Magnum Photos.

ofoesaysit:

Portraits of Accra City, My City

Photography by Ofoe Amegavie, 2014

chrisnolan-ca:

In continuing the recent theme of portraits of powerful women, here is a selection of Maxim Vakhovskiy‘s figure portraits featuring women and their babies.  Check out his book, Black Venus and many of his other stunning photographs on his tumblr.

medievalpoc:

black-culture:

Kehinde Wiley’s paintings often blur the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation. Rendered in a realistic mode–while making references to specific Old Master paintings–Wiley creates a fusion of period styles, ranging from French Rococo, Islamic architecture and West African textile design to urban hip hop and the “Sea Foam Green” of a Martha Stewart Interiors color swatch. Wiley’s slightly larger than life size figures are depicted in a heroic manner, as their poses connote power and spiritual awakening. Wiley’s portrayal of masculinity is filtered through these poses of power and spirituality.

Contemporary Art Week!

Kehinde Wiley official website

shit-gets-real-when:

cooltallguy1202:

eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad

A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad,
Have no shame, you’re mine for good;
We share a sole insurgent fire,
We live in boundless brotherhood.

I do not fear the gibes of men;
One being split in two we dwell,
The kernel of a double nut
Embedded in a single shell.

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)

Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”

Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”

Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not.

The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.

But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here.

 

This is so cool!

i like this !!!!

Amor